Goodbye Blue Sky – Pink Floyd

We humans like to cling to things. Especially hope. During times of fear and struggle we hang dangling over darkness and uncertainty, clinging to our frayed threads of hope until our knuckles turn white. If we can hang on long enough, hope can get us through times of violence and destruction. But what about when the violence and destruction returns? We cling to the hope that things will get better, and for a time, they might. But it seems that some new conflict always arises to break down our sense of security and forces us to once again grip precariously to our threadbare hope.

If the violence and struggle keeps coming back again and again, then there must be something we’re doing wrong. There has to be some kind of change we can make to really, truly, make things better. Continue reading

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Remembering John Lennon

Today, December 8, 1980, the world lost John Lennon.

I’m not going to say much — so much about John Lennon has already been said. Rather than listen to what everyone has to say about him — that he was an icon, that he was an individual, that he was a genius, that he was a hero, that he was a rebel, that he was a heretic, that he was a messiah. In each head, there is a different picture and a different perspective of who or what John Lennon was. But there is one thing that can’t be argued: the fact that he left a massive impact on the world as he knew it. Continue reading

Isn’t It A Pity – George Harrison

The world is full of problems: hunger, poverty, disease, abuse, intolerance, destruction of the environment, homicide, suicide, genocide, entire nations at war with each other, and so much more that brings pain and suffering to the world. But this is not the saddest part. What I find to be the most bizarre and mind-boggling is that all of us sympathize with at least one of these problems. We can all tell that something is wrong. We all want an end to these problems. We all feel that something must be done.

But how many people will actually do something?

The thing about people is that they can see suffering on their TV’s, they can read about it in the news, they can even be a spectator of it on the street, but very rarely will they cast a second glance after thinking, “Oh, how awful!” before continuing on their way. The problem is not that people are insensitive – for the most part everyone will feel something after witnessing a tragedy – the problem is that most people do not think of how much their actions can make a difference. Continue reading

All wars are actually food fights

When two eight-year olds get into a fight over a bouncy ball on the playground, they are separated and must then endure a lecture about how fighting is not the civil way to resolve conflict and that the way grown-ups solve problems is by utilizing effective communication. But do they really? Entire nations “solve” their problems this way because for whatever reason, most humans find that belligerent behavior resolves conflict. But why? Are wars waged by the world’s most powerful nations any different from a food fight in an elementary school cafeteria? Please check out this writer’s take on war and find out if it is really a noble and valiant cause or a pointless loss of life to a childish quarrel.

snowflakes are hexagons

Plato once said: “Only the dead have seen the end of war”.

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We Can Work it Out – the Beatles

There will always be conflict in world, whether over resources, political views, religion, or our physical differences, but there is also always a solution. The question is, if there is always a solution that avoids conflict, then why do people continue to fight wars? To persecute one another? To kill over our problems rather than reason them out like civilized human beings? The legendary Fab Four discuss the many reasons why people are unwilling to peacefully cooperate with each other in their timeless classic, “We Can Work it Out”. Released in 1965, “We Can Work it Out” initially appears to be about a couple’s struggles in their relationship but has since grown to be a song that portrays a message of love and tolerance, teaching that there is always hope for a peaceful solution to conflict. Continue reading