Songs for Submersion

I’ve never been much good at sleeping. From the hours of 8:00 am to about 8:00 pm, I’ve got weights tied to my limbs and head, I’m dragging and exhausted. But once the sun goes away and it’s dark and cool outside, my brain is filled words and ideas and melodies and it overflows until I have to lay in my bed writing all over my hands and arms to get everything out, and to make sure that I won’t forget when the sun rises. By about midnight, I itch to play my guitar so badly that it feels as though my insides are on the verge of tearing open and exploding, but facing the wrath of my family, recently awakened by a late-night jam session, would probably be worse than self implosion. Since I can’t make my own music at this time, I do the next best thing: listen to other people’s music.

When I’m like an accumulation of hyperactive, excited gaseous particles, I need a steady beat to crawl into my ears and liquify me. I need to bathe in vibrations, and come out fresh and clean and enlightened. Continue reading

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Pattie Boyd: a Muse of the Modern Age

Pattie Boyd Story

There are many reasons to make music. Music can be a voice for those who otherwise are not heard. People are inspired to write music to express emotions of frustration, joy, melancholy, and loss. But above all, there seems to be one emotion that makes people want to sing and dance more than any other. It’s love. Love is one of the most powerful drivers of creativity, and amongst all of those who have been the source of inspiration for love songs there are few that are more powerful than those written for Pattie Boyd, who inspired not one but two of the greatest musicians of recent times: George Harrison and Eric Clapton. A true story of love, friendship, desperation, and betrayal; something of a scandal that resulted in the creation of what have been deemed by some to be a few of the greatest love songs of all time. Continue reading

Mr. Tambourine Man – Bob Dylan

The legendary Bob Dylan’s “Mr. Tambourine Man” has been a favorite of people across the globe – from concert halls to campfires – since its release in 1965. It has been covered by many credible artists, with the Byrd’s version being the most famous. Dylan utilizes poetic metaphors and abstract imagery to portray his message: the source of inspiration. Because the song’s metaphors are pretty recondite, I’m mainly going to focus on interpreting the lyrics rather than delving into its background or Dylan’s inspirations for the song. Continue reading